Innovation Blueprints for Long-Term American Success

by Editor@TheInnovationEconomy  | February 22, 2013

Editor@TheInnovationEconomy The Innovation Economy

By Peter Cleveland, vice president, Global Public Policy, Intel Corporation

On Monday, Intel in partnership with The Aspen Institute convened a thought provoking roundtable discussion addressing the topic, “Innovation Blueprints: Key Investments for Long Term American Success.”

The event, moderated by David Leonhardt, Washington Bureau Chief at The New York Times; featured, Dean Garfield, President of the Information Technology Industry Council; Neera Tanden, President of the Center for American Progress and included approximately thirty leaders from academia, government, private sector and media in addition to our host Walter Isaacson, President and CEO of The Aspen Institute.

I had an opportunity to participate and while the discussion was diverse, addressing a wide range of domestic and foreign policy issues, there was an overwhelming sense that as a nation we need to be more strategic in both our policies and long-term investments if we are to maintain U.S. national competitiveness in the long term.

Below are three common threads from the discussion that I believe are critical to a long-term strategy for American innovation and economic growth:

1. Investing in our Workforce: In a time of economic challenge, increasing global competition and rapidly advancing technology, investing in the education of our young people is critical to American competitiveness and sustainable economic growth – particularly in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) that will drive future innovation.

And conscious of our history, we need to remember that the next great American inventor isn’t always home-grown; both Intel and the United States have a rich history of immigrant innovators. Smart reform of our high-skilled immigration policies will ensure the U.S. continues to serve as a beacon, attracting the best and brightest from around the world to study, start businesses and create jobs here in America.

2. Building Public-Private Partnerships: Public-Private investment and partnerships have played a critical role in bringing private sector ingenuity and efficiency to bear in meeting national challenges throughout our history. The path to and ultimate achievement of the Apollo project is a perfect example which secured American technological leadership for decades to come.

As competition increases from around the world, the U.S. needs a permanent structure in place that encourages and supports public and private research and development in the basic sciences and emerging technological frontiers that will ensure American innovation leadership in the years to come.

3. Fostering Investment & Entrepreneurship: As the dynamics of the world economy continue to shift, we need to ensure U.S. trade and tax policies are in-line with our national interests and globally competitive, attracting foreign investment and encouraging American companies to build and create the jobs of the future here in the United States.

Looking 15 years into the future, we will undoubtedly see innovations that hardly seem possible today. Already we’re seeing the beginnings of this world though 3D printing, driverless cars and the increasing instrumentation of the world around us. If we take the long view and make the critical investments now, we can pave the road to achieving this future, and foster American innovation and continued economic growth in the process.

The discussion forum we held this week is the latest in a series of events Intel has convened over the years in partnership with The Aspen Institute on the crucial elements the U.S. needs to address to foster innovation and keep the U.S. globally competitive. Learn more about The Innovation Economy.


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Sec. Clinton at the "Innovation & Global Marketplace" event on 12/14

by Editor@TheInnovationEconomy  | December 14, 2011

Editor@TheInnovationEconomy The Innovation Economy

On December 14, 2011, The Innovation Economy partners hosted "Innovation and the Global Marketplace: A Discussion on American Innovation, Trade and the Next 10 Million Jobs."

During the event U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton explored the critical connections between American jobs, economic growth and U.S. relationships around the world, through issues like trade agreements, public diplomacy, global innovation patterns and policies, the impact of technology on international relationships and geopolitics, and the rapidly changing global marketplace.

Check back soon for full video and more event photos.

 

 

NewsHour Previews “Innovation & the Global Marketplace”

by Editor@TheInnovationEconomy  | December 12, 2011

Editor@TheInnovationEconomy The Innovation Economy

PBS NewsHour’s Hari Sreenivasan previews the upcoming “Innovation and the Global Marketplace: A Discussion on American Innovation, Trade and the Next 10 Million Jobs” event, which features a conversation between Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and NewsHour’s Jim Lehrer. Watch LIVE on Dec. 14 starting at 8:45 a.m. EST. For more information.

 

Follow The Innovation Economy on Twitter (@InnovationEcon) for real-time event updates and check out the official event hashtag #IEglobalmkt for LIVE tweeting from the event.

 

Join us for “Innovation and the Global Marketplace”

by Editor@TheInnovationEconomy  | December 2, 2011

Editor@TheInnovationEconomy The Innovation Economy

Over the next 20 years, the size of the global middle class is set to grow dramatically from 1.8 billion (today) to potentially 5 billion people in 2030, according to a 2010 Brookings Institution report.

 

In light of our increasingly interconnected world and expanding global middle class, The Innovation Economy conversation this year has focused on the vital role of innovation in the global marketplace, specifically – the critical connections between American jobs, the exchange of ideas, global trade and U.S. relationships around the world.

 

Earlier this year, we hosted a conversation at The Aspen Institute with Ambassador Ron Kirk, United States Trade Representative, on how best to access the promise of global markets, the connection between open markets and the innovation economy, and the priority of saving and creating American jobs as we pursue economic growth.

 

Next week, we will continue that conversation with a discussion about how both the global and American innovation economies will be impacted as markets and the global middle class expand.  In particular, how does this expansion influence competition, education and innovation within and between nations?

 

As the culmination of this year’s discussion on the global innovation economy, we invite you to join The Aspen Institute, PBS NewsHour and Intel Corporation on Wednesday, December 14, at 8:45 a.m. EST to watch the LIVE webcast of:

 

INNOVATION AND THE GLOBAL MARKETPLACE

A Discussion on American Innovation, Trade and the Next 10 Million Jobs

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Hillary Clinton, U.S. Secretary of State, interviewed by Jim Lehrer, Executive Editor, PBS NewsHour

 

The event will explore the critical connections between American jobs, economic growth and U.S. relationships around the world, through issues like trade agreements, public diplomacy, global innovation patterns and policies, the impact of technology on international relationships and geopolitics, and the rapidly changing global marketplace.

 

This half-day event will be webcast live on www.TheInnovationEconomy.org. 

 

Follow The Innovation Economy on Twitter (@InnovationEcon) for real-time event updates and check out the official event hashtag #IEglobalmkt for LIVE tweeting from the event.

 

EVENT PROGRAM:

Innovation, Trade and Creating the Next 10 Million Jobs

A discussion on the intersections among innovation, economic growth, job creation and global trade.

  •  C. Fred Bergsten, Director, The Peterson Institute for International Economics
  • Myron Brilliant, Senior Vice President, International Affairs, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
  • Thea Mei Lee, Deputy Chief of Staff, AFL-CIO
  • Karen Mills, Administrator, U.S. Small Business Administration
  • Moderated by Jeffrey Brown, Senior Correspondent, PBS NewsHour 

 

A Zero-Sum Game? The Expanding Global Marketplace and the Innovation Economy

A conversation on the impact of the burgeoning middle class in China, India and around the developing world.

  • Lael Brainard, Under Secretary for International Affairs, U.S. Department of the Treasury
  • Orville Schell, Arthur Ross Director, Center on U.S.-China Relations, Asia Society
  • Robert J. Shapiro, Co-Founder and Chairman, Sonecon, LLC
  • Moderated by Paul Solman, Business and Economics Correspondent, PBS NewsHour

 

Innovation and American Jobs

Insights on the policies that will enhance American technological innovation and facilitate job creation.

  • Tom Connelly, Executive Vice President and Chief Innovation Officer, DuPont
  • Jim Rogers, Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, Duke Energy
  • Andy Stern, President Emeritus, Service Employees International Union
  • Moderated by Vijay Vaitheeswaran, China Business, Finance & Technology Editor, The Economist

President Obama: To Win the Future, America Must Win the Global Competition in Education

by Editor@TheInnovationEconomy  | February 22, 2011

Editor@TheInnovationEconomy The Innovation Economy

In last Saturday’s weekly address, President Obama underscored the vital importance of education to America’s global competitiveness and our long-term economic growth.  Speaking at Intel’s Hillsboro, Oregon campus, the President stated:

 

If we want to win the global competition for new jobs and industries, we’ve got to win the global competition to educate our people.  We’ve got to have the best trained, best skilled workforce in the world. (President Barack Obama, Feb. 19 Weekly Address)

 

Investing in and improving education is vital to our country’s future – particularly in the fields that are leading our technology-based innovation economy: science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

 

We saw further evidence of this during this past December’s “Education for Innovation: A Digital Town Hall,” with the release of a new report on STEM education from The Information Technology & Innovation Foundation (ITIF): “Refueling the U.S. Innovation Economy.” 

 

For over a half century, science-based innovation has powered America’s economy, creating good jobs, a high standard of living, and U.S. economic and political leadership. Yet, our nation’s global share of activity in STEM-focused industries is in decline, jeopardizing our status as the world’s leader in innovation.  Moreover, there is clear evidence that the United States is consistently not able to produce enough of its own STEM workers in key fields (e.g., computer science, electrical engineering), even though the best universities for studying these subjects are U.S.-based. (ITIF, Refueling the U.S. Innovation Economy)

 

The urgency in this report, underscored by President Obama’s recent statements, demonstrates both our need and our ability to improve U.S. education and ignite a culture of curiosity in our students and our classrooms.  During his weekly address, President Obama illustrated the enormous potential of America’s youth:

 

One young woman, Laurie Rumker, conducted a chemistry experiment to investigate ways to protect our water from pollution.  Another student, named Yushi Wang, applied the principles of quantum physics to design a faster computer chip.  We’re talking about high school students.

 

So these have been a tough few years for our country.  And in tough times, it’s natural to question what the future holds.  But when you meet young people like Laurie and Yushi, it’s hard not to be inspired.  And it’s impossible not to be confident about America. (President Barack Obama, Feb. 19 Weekly Address)

 

By investing in education, we will help to create the next generation of innovators that will build U.S. global competitiveness, drive sustainable economic growth and, as the President said, win the future.

 

Watch the full video of President Obama’s February 19 weekly address, below.

 

 

 


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Categories: Education